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Worker Safety

To a varying degree, livestock producers face hazards in the agricultural environment. Certain chemicals and molds cause illness; humans occasionally contract livestock diseases; even livestock, if handled improperly, can cause serious injury. Simple precautionary measures, however, can be taken to reduce the risk of sickness, injury and even death.

Topics:
Agricultural Diseases and Humans
Respiratory Illnesses
Noise
Safe Livestock Handling

Agricultural Diseases and Humans

BSE: Need to Know Information for Agricultural Producers
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture
What is BSE? How is it spread? How does BSE spread to humans? Find answers to these and other questions in this factsheet. (PDF)

Diseases Transmitted from Animals to Humans
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture
A number of animals in the farm environment can transmit diseases to humans. This factsheet covers many of the diseases producers should be aware of.

Respiratory Illnesses

General Respiratory Hazards on the Farm
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture
Respiratory conditions associated with agriculture, including bronchitis, asthma and farmer's lung. Preventative measures are offered.

Dust
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture

Beef producers are exposed to dust in confined livestock buildings and when feeding animals. Read about safe practices for preventing dust exposure and the health problems that can result from it. (PDF)

Molds and Fungi
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture
Damp grains, straw and hay in livestock feeds provide ideal conditions for the growth of molds and fungi. Even after only 4-6 hours of exposure to these molds and fungi can cause a number of respiratory illnesses in humans. (PDF)

Gases and Mists
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture
This factsheet covers the gases that pose risks to beef producers, such as those gases that accumulate in confined spaces: ammonia and hydrogen sulphide. Included are the risk levels faced by producers, and preventative measures that should be taken to reduce exposure to these gases. (PDF)

Respiratory Protection for Producers
Alberta Agriculture and Food
The use of respirators can prevent the short- and long-term respiratory problems caused by dust and harmful gases. Read about the different types of respirators, their selection, maintenance and storage.

Personal Protective Equipment for the Respiratory System
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture
What are the different types of respirators? How do you choose a respirator? How do you store and properly fit yourself with one? Find out here. (PDF)

Noise

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture
Learn how excessive noise leads to hearing loss, and how to protect workers, your family, and yourself from hearing loss.

Safe Livestock Handling

Preventing Injuries and Falls
Temple Grandin, Livestock Handling Specialist, Colorado State University
Ways of preventing cattle and worker injuries.

Preventing Bull Accidents
Temple Grandin, Livestock Handling Specialist, Colorado State University
Prevent bull attacks by taking its behaviour into account.

Understanding Flight Zone and Point of Balance
Temple Grandin, Livestock Handling Specialist, Colorado State University
The handling techniques of livestock specialist Temple Grandin are based on animal behaviour and designed to minimize stress to the animal. These techniques also make handling safer for producers.

Low-Stress Cattle Herding (Video)
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture
A video illustrating the importance of low-stress cattle handling, which can reduce livestock handling-related injuries.

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