News

  • Leaders in discovery: five USask researchers honoured with top provincial health awards

    Dr. Volker Gerdts, director and CEO of VIDO and professor in the Western College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan, has been recognized with an Achievement Award by the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (SHRF).

  • VIDO awarded over a million dollars for innovative research projects

    Five VIDO scientists were awarded over $1 million in total from Saskatchewan’s Agriculture Development Fund (ADF)—a program jointly funded by the provincial and federal governments.

  • Canada needs to plan for inevitable future pandemics

    Despite the continuing emergence of new variants and outbreaks of COVID-19, the current pandemic is starting to recede from many Canadians’ minds.

  • VIDO’s economic impact over half a billion dollars: SREDA study

    The Saskatoon Regional Economic Development Authority's Economic Impact Study concluded VIDO’s operations and construction projects contributed more than $511 million to the economy in the last decade.

  • VIDO part of western Canadian team developing tools to stop chronic wasting disease

    Drs. Scott Napper, Philip Griebel and Suresh Tikoo are part of a western Canadian multidisciplinary team awarded a $4.25 million NSERC Alliance Grant to develop mitigation strategies for chronic wasting disease.

  • New $8.1 million funding for VIDO will protect Canadians and our animals from high consequence pathogens

    VIDO has received a significant investment from the Canada Foundation for Innovation to establish containment Level 4 capacity—the highest level of containment. Once completed, this will make VIDO the only non-government CL4 facility in Canada.

  • Individual donors vital for VIDO to become Canada’s Centre for Pandemic Research

    VIDO is one of our province’s most outstanding success stories. An important part of its future is now up to us.

  • Research team aims to develop vaccines for prion diseases

    Even Dr. Scott Napper uses words such as scary when describing the focus of his research—a group of diseases caused when otherwise innocuous proteins go rogue, creating conditions that are always fatal and currently untreatable.

  • Researchers’ study of Salmonella transmission first of its kind

    Dr. Aaron White and his team recently received a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant to get to the heart — or the gut — of how and why Salmonella bacteria continue to thrive.

  • CEPI: The Race to Future-Proof Coronavirus Vaccines

    "What we’re striving for is something that can be broadly protective not only against what’s circulating now, but also in the future as the virus mutates."